By Jeremy Foote

El Camino, the newest release from Ohio band Black Keys, lives up to the expectations set by their previous album, Brothers, while moving in a different creative direction. The duo, consisting of vocalist/guitarist Dan Auerbach and drummer/producer Patrick Carney, have become alternative music icons. Their music makes abundantly clear why this is the case. Lonely Boy, the record’s lead single, ties back to an earlier age with its heavy bass guitar line reminiscent of The Clash or T.Rex. This sets the tone for the rest of the album, which consists largely of uptempo tracks that bring about a certain timeless rock and roll feel, while maintaining a contemporary voice. Another popular track is Little Black Submarines, which starts off slowly but breaks out into two minutes of wonderful electric guitar riffs that really get your foot tapping. Gold on the Ceiling also features prominent guitar sections, with a steadier bass that resonates perfectly with Auerbach’s intentionally off pitch vocals.

By Jeremy Foote

I’ve got a couple questions for those of who you drink coffee. Have you ever had a craving for a bit of style with your drink? Are you tired of trudging to (shudder) Coffee Time in the mornings? Have you ever felt that coffee is about more than just roasting beans and pouring it in a cup? If so, then read on, because you are about to be introduced to the indie coffee trade of Toronto. From converted garages to hipster cafes to circus gymnasiums, this is the place to pick up a double shot of culture, art, and of course, some stylish coffee, from Main Street all the way to Roncesvalles Avenue. The plan? Start at the East End and work my way westward. Before I begin, however, I would like to say one thing: this column is a review of the atmosphere and vibe of these independent spots. I’ll leave it up to you to judge the coffee itself.